Podiatry Blog
By Complete Foot & Ankle Specialists
September 24, 2021
Category: Foot Care
High Blood Pressure and Your FeetWhether you are concerned about high blood pressure or you already have been diagnosed with this chronic condition you may be surprised to hear that it can also impact your feet. After all, your blood pressure affects your circulatory system, which in turn impacts the body as a whole. Since uncontrolled or improperly controlled hypertension can damage blood vessels of the feet, you must have a podiatrist you can turn to to make sure your condition is under control.

What problems does high blood pressure pose?

People with hypertension often deal with plaque buildup in the blood vessels. This is known as atherosclerosis. Plaque buildup also causes a decrease in circulation in the legs and feet. This can also increase your risk for peripheral artery disease (PAD). Over time, this decreased circulation can also lead to ulcers and, in more severe cases, amputation. This is why it’s incredibly important that you have a podiatrist that you turn to regularly for checkups and care if you have been diagnosed with hypertension.

What are the signs of poor circulation in the feet?
 

Wondering if you may already be dealing with poor circulation? Here are some of the telltale signs:

  • Your feet and legs cramp up, especially during physical activity
  • Color changes to the feet
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Temperature changes in your feet
  • Hair loss on the legs or feet
  • Sores
If you are dealing with any of these symptoms you must schedule an appointment with your podiatrist. Simple physical exams and non-invasive tests can be conducted to determine how much loss of circulation is occurring in the feet. Your podiatrist will work with your primary doctor to make sure that your current medication is properly controlling your blood pressure.

By getting your blood pressure under control we can also reduce your risk for developing PAD, heart disease, and other complications associated with hypertension. Some medications can be prescribed by your podiatrist to improve peripheral artery disease. Surgery may also be necessary to remove the blockage or widen the blood vessel to improve blood flow to the legs and feet.

If you are worried about your hypertension and how it may be impacting the health of your feet, there is never a better time to turn to a podiatrist for answers, support, and care.
By Complete Foot & Ankle Specialists
August 30, 2021
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Cavus Foot  
High Arches in ChildrenWhen babies are born they are born with flat feet. Typically the arches of the feet don’t develop until children are 3-4 years old; however, sometimes the arches of the feet develop higher than they should, which can cause the feet to flex. This is known as cavus foot and this problem typically occurs within the first 10 years of a child’s life. Since this condition can impact mobility you must see a podiatrist if this is something you think your child might be dealing with.

The Problem with Cavus Foot

Cavus foot needs to be addressed right away by a podiatrist, as this condition can lead to a variety of issues for your child. Cavus foot is more likely to lead to imbalances within the feet, which in turn can also impact the function of the ankle, legs, hips, and even lower back. Children and teens with cavus foot may be more likely to deal with aches, pains, and strains within the feet, ankles, legs, and hips. This condition can also lead to metatarsalgia, Achilles tendonitis, and chronic ankle sprains.

Causes of Cavus Foot

In many cases, a muscle or nerve disorder that impacts how the muscles function causes cavus foot. This leads to imbalances that cause the distinctive high arches of this condition. Of course, other conditions such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, muscular dystrophy, and spina bifida can also increase the chances of developing cavus foot.

Treating Cavus Foot

You must be watching your little ones as they start to walk to see if you notice any differences in how they move. Catching these issues early offers your child the best chance at improved mobility and less risk for developing foot problems later on. Your podiatrist may work together with a neurologist to pinpoint whether a nerve disorder could be the underlying cause.

Once your foot specialist determines the root cause of your child’s cavus foot then they can map out a customized treatment plan. Milder cases may benefit from more conservative treatment options such as custom orthotics and arch supports; however, surgery is often necessary to correct this problem.

Any issues with mobility, particularly in children, should be addressed and assessed as quickly as possible. Turn to a podiatrist that also specializes in providing pediatric podiatry to children and teens, as they will be able to provide the most thorough treatment plan for your little one.
By Complete Foot & Ankle Specialists
August 18, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Morton’s Neuroma  
Mortons NeuromaAre you experiencing a sharp, burning pain between your toes that gets worse when walking or standing? Do you notice tingling or numbness in the toes, or pain and swelling on the soles of the feet? If so, you could be dealing with a condition known as Morton’s neuroma that causes thickening of the nerves between the toes. If you suspect that you might have Morton’s neuroma, a podiatrist will be the ideal doctor to turn to for treatment.

Are neuromas dangerous?

It’s important not to confuse a neuroma with Morton’s neuroma. A neuroma is a benign growth that develops on the nerves; however, Morton’s neuroma is not a growth; it’s simply inflammation and swelling of the tissue around the nerves that lie between the toes (often between the third and fourth toes).

What causes Morton’s neuroma?

Any kind of intense pressure or compression placed on these toes can lead to inflammation of the tissue around the nerves. Some people are more at risk for developing Morton’s neuroma. Risk factors include:
  • Playing certain sports such as running or tennis, which puts pressure on the balls of the feet
  • Wearing high heels with a heel that’s more than 2 inches tall
  • Wearing narrow shoes or shoes with pointed toes
  • Certain foot conditions such as bunions or hammertoes
  • Flat feet or high arches (or other congenital foot problems)
What are the signs of Morton’s neuroma?

Since this condition involves inflamed tissue, you won’t notice a growth or bump in the area; however, you may simply experience pain that is gradual and minor at first and is alleviated by not wearing shoes. Symptoms often get worse with time and result in:
  • Swelling between the toes
  • A sharp burning pain between the toes that gets worse with activity
  • Tingling or numbness in the foot
  • Feeling like there is a pebble or stone in your shoe (often at the balls of the feet)
  • Pain that’s intensified by standing on your tiptoes or wearing high heels or pointed-toe shoes
How is this foot problem treated?

Most people can alleviate their symptoms through simple lifestyle modifications including:
  • Icing
  • Rest
  • Massaging your feet
  • Shoe pads
  • Custom shoe inserts (that a podiatrist can craft just for you)
  • Supportive footwear that offers shock-absorption
  • Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Steroid injections
  • Local anesthetic injections
Any persistent or severe foot pain or swelling, along with numbness or tingling, should be addressed right away by a podiatrist. There are many conditions, some serious, that can cause a lot of these same symptoms and a podiatrist will be able to provide an immediate and accurate diagnosis for your symptoms.
By Complete Foot & Ankle Specialists
August 03, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Custom Orthotics   Orthotics  

Complete Foot & Ankle Specialists is here for all your foot care needs. Dr. Eric Anderson, Dr. Richard Jennings, and Dr. Melitta Simmons fit patients with custom orthotics in Bellefontaine, OH, and Springfield, OH, to help align the bones in your foot and relieve pain while you walk. Keep reading about custom orthotics and come see us to be fit with your own!

What are custom orthotics?

Custom orthotics are devices made from a mold of your foot and worn in the shoes, either for extra support or protection for the foot. They vary in size and shape depending on the foot condition they are for but fall under three main types.

Rigid orthotics are made from a firm material and designed to control the motion of your two major foot joints. Semi-rigid orthotics are made of layers of soft material reinforced with rigid material, and these are used to promote proper balance as you move around. Soft orthotics are made of soft material that is used to cushion the feet, absorb shock, and improve balance for the patient.

When you get custom orthotics in Bellefontaine, OH, or Springfield, OH, they are made from a mold after a podiatrist takes a cast or image of your foot. You will be fitted with orthotics designed to control the movement of the bones in your foot and accommodate any biomechanical foot issue you have.

How can custom orthotics help?

Orthotics can be prescribed to help treat all kinds of foot ailments, or correct how you stand, walk, or run. Custom orthotics are often recommended for patients with:

  • Foot pain
  • Flat feet
  • Diabetes
  • Bunions
  • Bursitis or arthritis
  • Tendonitis
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Neuropathy

Patients with any of these conditions can benefit from custom orthotics for their shoes. Custom orthotics should increase your comfort level, improve balance, and reduce any pain in your feet.

Complete Foot & Ankle Specialists offers custom orthotics for patients in the Bellefontaine, Springfield, and London, OH area. Dr. Eric Anderson, Dr. Richard Jennings, and Dr. Melitta Simmons prescribe custom orthotics to relieve pain and treat your feet! Contact us for an appointment in Bellefontaine at (937) 599-3668 and in Springfield at (937) 322-3346.

By Complete Foot & Ankle Specialists
July 28, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Shoes   Footwear  
The Right ShoesWhen was the last time you bought new shoes? When was the last time you threw out shoes that were old and worn out? We often keep shoes long past the point where we should have retired them. Of course, other factors such as our age also play a role in the health of our feet, including our risk factors for developing certain conditions and also our footcare needs. Our feet have different needs and require different care as we get older. Here’s how to choose the appropriate shoes for all stages of life:
 
How Your Feet Change Over the Years

As we age, our feet will change shape and size, which can also predispose them to certain problems. This also means that your foot needs will change, particularly concerning footwear. Here’s how your feet will change:
  • Loss of fat pads
  • Dry, cracked skin
  • The development or worsening of certain deformities such as hammertoes or bunions
  • Widening or lengthening of the feet
  • Loss of bone density (which can increase your risk for fracture)
  • Changes in gait due to certain conditions such as neuropathy or arthritis
  • Diabetic-related foot problems
  • Issues with balance
Everyday Footwear for Aging Feet

You must look for shoes that provide proper cushioning and supportive insoles so that your feet can tackle the day-to-day activities. If you have foot problems or issues with gait, then you’ll want to turn to a podiatrist for an evaluation. Together, you can decide the proper footwear and whether prescription orthotics can also provide your feet with additional support and cushioning that footwear alone can’t.

You should turn to a specialty shoe store where they can analyze your gait, properly measure your feet, and determine whether the shoes you’re getting may require additional modifications including orthotics. For example, some shoes and brands adjust to foot swelling throughout the day, while others provide enough space to place orthotics.
 
There are also certain types of shoes that aging feet should avoid. Those include:
  • Any shoes with pointed toes
  • Shoes with heels over 2 inches
  • Shoes that aren’t non-slip
  • Sandals or flip-flops
  • Shoes that don’t have a firm sole (including your slippers)
  • Old, worn shoes (that simply need to be tossed)
  • Shoes with rocker soles (particularly if you have gait problems)
If you are having trouble finding the right shoes to fit your needs, or if you are interested in learning more about custom orthotics and how it could provide additional support for your feet, turn to your podiatrist today for the care your feet deserve.




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